Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

19 notes &

beatrixtobellatrix:

rachelfershleiser:

Kate Gavino of @lastnightsreading is live-drawing at @housingworksbks and it is just the greatest!

I stopped by the Bowery Poetry Club to hear Teju Cole speak this morning (along with Hari Kunzru and Katie Kitamura who I haven’t read) and fangirl-ed a lot to Lamya, my partner in crime for all things downtown literary fest, when I realized lastnightsreading was actively drawing the speakers.  Also Teju Cole is just as great of a speaker as I imagined, somehow infusing even casual chatter with sharp literary references and wry humor, and that was all I needed on a sunny Sunday. 

Confidential to beatrixtobellatrix: you will love Katie Kitamura. Start with The Longshot.
(To be fair, I am pretty sure everybody would like Katie Kitamura, I’m just 100% positive about this particular recommendation.)

beatrixtobellatrix:

rachelfershleiser:

Kate Gavino of @lastnightsreading is live-drawing at @housingworksbks and it is just the greatest!

I stopped by the Bowery Poetry Club to hear Teju Cole speak this morning (along with Hari Kunzru and Katie Kitamura who I haven’t read) and fangirl-ed a lot to Lamya, my partner in crime for all things downtown literary fest, when I realized lastnightsreading was actively drawing the speakers.  Also Teju Cole is just as great of a speaker as I imagined, somehow infusing even casual chatter with sharp literary references and wry humor, and that was all I needed on a sunny Sunday. 

Confidential to beatrixtobellatrix: you will love Katie Kitamura. Start with The Longshot.

(To be fair, I am pretty sure everybody would like Katie Kitamura, I’m just 100% positive about this particular recommendation.)

Filed under books bookadvice katie kitamura the longshot

45 notes &

I have found so far that nobody, bookseller nor librarian nor patron nor customer, wants to hear my very thoughtful thoughts regarding Frog Music by Emma Donoghue. They want only to know: “Is it like Room?” So here is a PSA:
No, Frog Music is nothing like Room.
It is really good, though, regardless of how you felt about Room.
I hope this is helpful to you!

I have found so far that nobody, bookseller nor librarian nor patron nor customer, wants to hear my very thoughtful thoughts regarding Frog Music by Emma Donoghue. They want only to know: “Is it like Room?” So here is a PSA:

No, Frog Music is nothing like Room.

It is really good, though, regardless of how you felt about Room.

I hope this is helpful to you!

Filed under books bookadvice emma donoghue frog music room

101 notes &

This is my Internet Chicken. I wanted to roast a chicken but was overwhelmed by the number of ways the Internet recommended to do so, so I asked Facebook, at which point I was overwhelmed by the number of ways Facebook thought I could roast a chicken. To cope, I roasted this chicken by combining several recommendations:
I started with Thomas Keller’s Simple Roast Chicken recipe because it got the most mentions, and because I can’t resist any recipe that includes instructions to “rain the salt” over something;
I followed Martha Stewart’s recommendation to pierce a lemon with a fork repeatedly and put it in the cavity;
I followed a friend’s idea to line the roasting pan with potato rounds, carrots, and a rough cut onion;
I took another friend’s advice to trust the thermometer rather than the timer;
I added a bunch of garlic cloves to everything because it seemed like a lot of people mentioned garlic.
It was, of course, fantastic, because apparently there is no wrong way to roast a chicken. The Internet! Is there anything it can’t do? Internet Chicken.

This is my Internet Chicken. I wanted to roast a chicken but was overwhelmed by the number of ways the Internet recommended to do so, so I asked Facebook, at which point I was overwhelmed by the number of ways Facebook thought I could roast a chicken. To cope, I roasted this chicken by combining several recommendations:

  • I started with Thomas Keller’s Simple Roast Chicken recipe because it got the most mentions, and because I can’t resist any recipe that includes instructions to “rain the salt” over something;
  • I followed Martha Stewart’s recommendation to pierce a lemon with a fork repeatedly and put it in the cavity;
  • I followed a friend’s idea to line the roasting pan with potato rounds, carrots, and a rough cut onion;
  • I took another friend’s advice to trust the thermometer rather than the timer;
  • I added a bunch of garlic cloves to everything because it seemed like a lot of people mentioned garlic.

It was, of course, fantastic, because apparently there is no wrong way to roast a chicken. The Internet! Is there anything it can’t do? Internet Chicken.

Filed under food chicken the internet thomas keller martha stewart

23 notes &

Every year I look forward to the Tournament of Books for several reasons, but primarily because it forces me to read a book I’ve had on the pile for ages. As the ToB has come to an end this week, that book has been The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara, at first because of its bracket-busting abilities. Any book that could potentially be better than Life After Life and The Goldfinch seemed like a good choice. And: wow! Was it ever!
I like nothing more than being surprised by a book, and this book surprised me on multiple fronts. I finished it this morning, and was stunned into staring out the train window at the sunrise. As both judgments linked above make clear, Yanagihara is a spectacular writer. What’s impressive beyond her obvious ability, though, is her ability to write in the pompous voice of a horrible person while simultaneously skewering that person, all without her beautiful descriptions of a heartbreakingly fictional time and location feeling out of place. Further, though she builds up tension so subtly that I’m not sure I’d be able to expect it on a re-read, that tension strengthens to the point of near breath-holding in the final sections.
Life After Life came back in the Zombie Round and beat it, and I can see why—though this book is incredible, I think Life was a masterpiece. But it’s fitting, because this book reminds me, in spirit, of Atkinson’s debut novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. It is similarly audacious, and has inspired a similar devotion: I will read anything Yanagihara writes moving forward, as I do for Atkinson. 

Every year I look forward to the Tournament of Books for several reasons, but primarily because it forces me to read a book I’ve had on the pile for ages. As the ToB has come to an end this week, that book has been The People in the Trees by Hanya Yanagihara, at first because of its bracket-busting abilities. Any book that could potentially be better than Life After Life and The Goldfinch seemed like a good choice. And: wow! Was it ever!

I like nothing more than being surprised by a book, and this book surprised me on multiple fronts. I finished it this morning, and was stunned into staring out the train window at the sunrise. As both judgments linked above make clear, Yanagihara is a spectacular writer. What’s impressive beyond her obvious ability, though, is her ability to write in the pompous voice of a horrible person while simultaneously skewering that person, all without her beautiful descriptions of a heartbreakingly fictional time and location feeling out of place. Further, though she builds up tension so subtly that I’m not sure I’d be able to expect it on a re-read, that tension strengthens to the point of near breath-holding in the final sections.

Life After Life came back in the Zombie Round and beat it, and I can see why—though this book is incredible, I think Life was a masterpiece. But it’s fitting, because this book reminds me, in spirit, of Atkinson’s debut novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum. It is similarly audacious, and has inspired a similar devotion: I will read anything Yanagihara writes moving forward, as I do for Atkinson. 

Filed under books the people in the trees hanya yanagihara life after life kate atkinson Tournament of Books readalikes readers' advisory bookadvice