Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

27 notes &

Books For Fans of Drunk History

I’ve started watching Drunk History and realized that many of the stories they feature, told pretty well therein, are told spectacularly well in a book. So this isn’t a bibliography of Drunk History, though that would be an interesting project. Instead, these are five books that not only relate to an episode of Drunk History, but are also really fantastic. Many historical books have a great story buried in them somewhere but aren’t that much fun to read—these are not those. 

If you liked Paget Brewster on Allan Pinkerton and Lincoln’s inauguration travels (season 2, episode 4), you would like The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War by Daniel Stashower. Equally good for true crime buffs as well as historical ones.

If you liked Mark Gagliardi on Stetson Kennedy and the KKK (season 1, episode 3), you would like There Goes My Everything: White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 1945-1975 by Jason Sokol. Deeply infuriating and inspiring by turns.

If you liked Amber Ruffin on Claudette Colvin (season 2, episode 1), you would like Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose. Though this won or was nominated for half the children’s book awards in the country, it’s detailed enough to work for adult readers as well.

If you liked Eric Falconer on the Statue of Liberty (season 2, episode 2), you would like Liberty’s Torch: The Great Adventure to Build The Statue of Liberty by Elizabeth Mitchell. As with most of the Drunk History stories, the full backstory on this is even more ridiculous than you can imagine.

If you liked Patrick Walsh on the presidential election of 1800 (season 2, episode 8), you would like A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America’s First Presidential Campaign by Edward J. Larson. This book is also great to cite around election time, when people start bitching about how there’s no civility in politics anymore, where did decent human kindness go, blah blah blah. (Since, as you’ve probably gathered, that is complete nonsense, elections have always been horrible.)

Bonus round: two stories that really ought to be on Drunk History and would likely appeal to fans of the show:

K Blows Top: A Cold War Comic Interlude, Starring Nikita Khrushchev, America’s Most Unlikely Tourist by Peter Carlson. (This could be an entire episode unto itself, with each of Khrushchev’s three US visits being a different segment. They are all that nutty.)

The President is a Sick Man: Wherein the Supposedly Virtuous Grover Cleveland Survives a Secret Surgery at Sea and Vilifies the Courageous Newspaperman Who Dared Expose the Truth by Matthew Algeo. (If that subtitle doesn’t convince you, I’m not sure I can say anything else that will.)

Filed under books tv drunk history paget brewster allan pinkerton abraham lincoln daniel stashower mark gagliardi stetson kennedy jason sokol amber ruffin claudette colvin phillip hoose eric falconer statue of liberty elizabeth mitchell patrick walsh nikita khrushchev peter carlson grover cleveland matthew algeo

23 notes &

gwendabond:

bennettmadison:

I’m reading Jincy Willett’s AMY FALLS DOWN, and this whole scene, in which several writers discuss their “process” on NPR, is a little too realistic.

This entire book — and its predecessor The Writing Class — are hilarious, sometimes poignant, wonders. I give them as gifts all the time. Jincy Willett is my favorite cranky writer.

Me too. I love Jincy. Winner of the National Book Award is an all-time favorite and is a must-read-someday for librarians.

gwendabond:

bennettmadison:

I’m reading Jincy Willett’s AMY FALLS DOWN, and this whole scene, in which several writers discuss their “process” on NPR, is a little too realistic.

This entire book — and its predecessor The Writing Class — are hilarious, sometimes poignant, wonders. I give them as gifts all the time. Jincy Willett is my favorite cranky writer.

Me too. I love Jincy. Winner of the National Book Award is an all-time favorite and is a must-read-someday for librarians.

Filed under books librarians tumblarians jincy willett

69 notes &

Hi. Talking about books on the Internet feels ridiculous to me right now, even though I am hiding in them (also Kardashians) constantly anymore, and many of them are quite good. You are already on the Internet, so you probably know about Bad Feminist, and about Roxane Gay, but let’s talk about it anyway. It is astonishingly good. It was the book I needed, and the book that you need. Even though I finished it about a week ago, and even though I read it on the plane, it’s somehow nested on my bedside table instead of the bookshelves. I like looking at it and pretending there are some essays inside that I haven’t read yet, like it’s the Internet in there, expanding and expanding! Never thought I would want a book to be more like the Internet.

Hi. Talking about books on the Internet feels ridiculous to me right now, even though I am hiding in them (also Kardashians) constantly anymore, and many of them are quite good. You are already on the Internet, so you probably know about Bad Feminist, and about Roxane Gay, but let’s talk about it anyway. It is astonishingly good. It was the book I needed, and the book that you need. Even though I finished it about a week ago, and even though I read it on the plane, it’s somehow nested on my bedside table instead of the bookshelves. I like looking at it and pretending there are some essays inside that I haven’t read yet, like it’s the Internet in there, expanding and expanding! Never thought I would want a book to be more like the Internet.

Filed under books roxane gay bad feminist

7 notes &


HELP UNACCOMPANIED MINORS IN THE NEW YORK AREA BOOK DRIVE: JULY 10 - AUGUST 10, 2014
We have received over 600 books, GRACIAS!
Many of you have asked how to financially support the book drive – here is your opportunity!  Donate to our ‘Unaccompanied Latin American Minor Project' Fund on IndieGogo. 
La Casa Azul Bookstore, in collaboration with the Unaccompanied Latin American Minor Project (U-LAMP) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/Safe Passage Project will host a book drive for children who were apprehended and detained at the Mexico-US border and are currently in deportation proceedings in the New York City area. The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health will join the project by make cards for the children and families. The cards will accompany the donated books.
Children and teenagers are living in both local shelters and residing with legal guardians and need new and gently used Spanish-language books in good condition. Bookstore staff will deliver books to local shelters and provide them directly to children and teenagers who are currently in deportation proceedings.
Books should be in Spanish, age appropriate and culturally relevant for mostly Central American and Mexican children and teenagers and mostly fall between the Pre-K to 8th grade reading levels.

HELP UNACCOMPANIED MINORS IN THE NEW YORK AREA BOOK DRIVE: JULY 10 - AUGUST 10, 2014

We have received over 600 books, GRACIAS!

Many of you have asked how to financially support the book drive – here is your opportunity!  Donate to our ‘Unaccompanied Latin American Minor Project' Fund on IndieGogo

La Casa Azul Bookstore, in collaboration with the Unaccompanied Latin American Minor Project (U-LAMP) at John Jay College of Criminal Justice/Safe Passage Project will host a book drive for children who were apprehended and detained at the Mexico-US border and are currently in deportation proceedings in the New York City area. The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health will join the project by make cards for the children and families. The cards will accompany the donated books.

Children and teenagers are living in both local shelters and residing with legal guardians and need new and gently used Spanish-language books in good condition. Bookstore staff will deliver books to local shelters and provide them directly to children and teenagers who are currently in deportation proceedings.

Books should be in Spanish, age appropriate and culturally relevant for mostly Central American and Mexican children and teenagers and mostly fall between the Pre-K to 8th grade reading levels.

Filed under books la casa azul bookstore U-LAMP