Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

32 notes &

Introducing RA Unconference!

darienlibrary:

raunconference:

Librarians with a particular interest in readers’ advisory are cordially invited to join a group of like-minded folk at Darien Library on Friday, May 16, 2014, for the Library’s first annual RA Unconference. Or, as we’ve been calling it, RAUNCON. (Pronounced RON-CON.) Darien Library is sponsoring is sponsoring this unconference, so registration is free, as is lunch that day. There are 80 spots for interested librarians. The schedule can be found here.

So happy to finally be announcing our first-ever RA unconference!

RAUNCON RAUNCON RAUNCON! Please note that this may be the first conference you’ve attended with scheduled sustained silent reading time.

Filed under libraries readers' advisory unconference rauncon

37 notes &

cloudunbound:

I came across this image in the Twitter feed of my friend Matt Finch, currently conducting amazing library programming in rural New South Wales. Kudos to The Bookseller (the leading publishing news publication in the UK) for getting behind public libraries, which are nearing extinction across the Pond.
It’s truly an emergency situation that won’t be solved by tweeting or tumbling alone, but it can’t be a bad thing for the UK publishing industry (including the shrinking number of indie bookstores) to pressure the government collectively to see its mistake. Whether that is actually happening is unclear from this cover; I’ll be making inquiries.
I have long thought launching ebook lending there in earnest could be a way to revitalize the dowdy image of UK public libraries. How they are perceived by English people is so different from how most Americans see theirs, I can’t begin to tell you.
Some good news: UK publishers are starting ebook lending pilots imminently. That is step one to what I hope will be a new day.
More later.

cloudunbound:

I came across this image in the Twitter feed of my friend Matt Finch, currently conducting amazing library programming in rural New South Wales. Kudos to The Bookseller (the leading publishing news publication in the UK) for getting behind public libraries, which are nearing extinction across the Pond.

It’s truly an emergency situation that won’t be solved by tweeting or tumbling alone, but it can’t be a bad thing for the UK publishing industry (including the shrinking number of indie bookstores) to pressure the government collectively to see its mistake. Whether that is actually happening is unclear from this cover; I’ll be making inquiries.

I have long thought launching ebook lending there in earnest could be a way to revitalize the dowdy image of UK public libraries. How they are perceived by English people is so different from how most Americans see theirs, I can’t begin to tell you.

Some good news: UK publishers are starting ebook lending pilots imminently. That is step one to what I hope will be a new day.

More later.

Filed under libraries

20 notes &

Ironically, now that publishers have stopped pinning “for readers who loved Gone Girl!” to any thriller with a complex female protagonist that stays put long enough, a book that is actually for readers who loved Gone Girl has popped up its head. That book is Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty. Chockablock with moral ambivalence and thoughtful examination of the relationships between men and (strong) women, this book will string you along slowly and then go for a punch that you know is coming, and which will surprise you anyway. One scene actively repulsed me (like, I was making weird lizardy motions with my neck trying to get away from it), which I always love in a book. Great smart thriller.

Ironically, now that publishers have stopped pinning “for readers who loved Gone Girl!” to any thriller with a complex female protagonist that stays put long enough, a book that is actually for readers who loved Gone Girl has popped up its head. That book is Apple Tree Yard by Louise Doughty. Chockablock with moral ambivalence and thoughtful examination of the relationships between men and (strong) women, this book will string you along slowly and then go for a punch that you know is coming, and which will surprise you anyway. One scene actively repulsed me (like, I was making weird lizardy motions with my neck trying to get away from it), which I always love in a book. Great smart thriller.

Filed under books apple tree yard louise doughty gone girl gillian flynn readers' advisory bookadvice fiction

54 notes &

I believe that great librarianship, the kind you should expect, crosses boundaries. Great librarianship is great whether it is in academia, or the public sphere, or K–12 schools. For that reason, this book is not about expecting more from public libraries or from school libraries, but from all libraries. School libraries have a lot to teach all good libraries about issues of assessment and learning. Public libraries have a lot to share about working with a wide range of demographics. Academic libraries understand the power of knowledge creation. Corporate libraries, and the ever-present bottom line, can teach us all about measuring impact…My goal in this book is to show you the potential of libraries. That potential will never be realized if libraries or their communities build up rigid boundaries.
From the intro of the complete text of R. David Lankes’s Expect More: Demanding Better Libraries for Today’s Complex Worldnow up on Medium. I have a printed copy of this book that is heavily highlighted, so obviously, I recommend it. (Tho you will undoubtedly, no matter who you are, disagree with some of it.) Now that it’s so easy to access, maybe we should start a tumblarian book group?

Filed under books libraries tumblarians r david lankes expect more medium

64 notes &

http://sarazarr.tumblr.com/post/77192646612/i-love-independent-book-stores-i-want-them-to

sarazarr:

I love independent book stores. I want them to succeed, and I hear and understand their frustrations about the Amazon situation. Over the years as an author, I’ve worked with some great, great indies and indie people who are on point with their management, strategy, customer relations, marketing, event planning. I have also worked with indies who are angry and distraught about Amazon but still running their businesses like there is no Amazon. Stores that make silly mistakes when it comes to using social media or don’t use it at all, stores that don’t communicate consistently or clearly with existing customers, or don’t try to figure out how to reach out to new ones, stores whose web sites don’t display their location and hours on the front page, stores that sell Kobos without explaining to customers how to set up an account so it actually benefits their store, stores that don’t hire smart, stores that have gone out of business two months after opening because they’re not creatively problem-solving how they can offer customers something Amazon can’t—because they have an attitude that says it’s the customer’s job to support and patronize them in solidarity against The Man (yeah, there was this one store that basically blamed local authors and its potential customers for its failure). I want indies to succeed and I do what I can to see that happen. But dude, in this climate, you gotta bring your A game. 

Observe: Sara gets into one paragraph more compassion and pragmatism about the current state of indie bookselling than most people can manage in a full article.

Filed under books bookselling amazon indie bookstores sara zarr

23 notes &

I finished Red or Dead by David Peace weeks ago and I still don’t know what to say about it, which was really bugging me, because I enjoyed it beyond all reason and wanted to write something that would convince all of you to give it a try. Luckily for me, Toby went ahead and wrote a highly literate and thoughtful review of the book, so I no longer feel I need to write about it.
So let me just say this, then. This book is a fucking masterpiece, okay? It’s worn me down and that is all I can say, because I’d rather think about it than talk about it. I have nothing thoughtful to offer you, nothing insightful, no new connections, no nothing, because this book is smarter and better than me, and I loved every second of it. I do hope it is the same for you.

I finished Red or Dead by David Peace weeks ago and I still don’t know what to say about it, which was really bugging me, because I enjoyed it beyond all reason and wanted to write something that would convince all of you to give it a try. Luckily for me, Toby went ahead and wrote a highly literate and thoughtful review of the book, so I no longer feel I need to write about it.

So let me just say this, then. This book is a fucking masterpiece, okay? It’s worn me down and that is all I can say, because I’d rather think about it than talk about it. I have nothing thoughtful to offer you, nothing insightful, no new connections, no nothing, because this book is smarter and better than me, and I loved every second of it. I do hope it is the same for you.

Filed under books red or dead david peace