Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

31 notes &

@jennirl made tutus for me and @erintheshea for the GLBT Pride 5K and a lady just told her daughter we are running ballerinas

@jennirl made tutus for me and @erintheshea for the GLBT Pride 5K and a lady just told her daughter we are running ballerinas

235 notes &

Drinks were a lot like books, really: it didn’t matter where you were, the contents of a vodka tonic were always more or less the same, and you could count on them to take you away to somewhere better or at least more interesting.
Lev Grossman, The Magician’s Land

Filed under books lev grossman the magician's land

57 notes &

In case you were wondering what management textbooks think of the publishing industry

In case you were wondering what management textbooks think of the publishing industry

217 notes &

RAUNCON asks: Where do you learn about books?

raunconference:

When librarians registered for this year’s Unconference, we asked them: Where do you learn about books? Many librarians, especially those new to RA, are overwhelmed by the sheer number of books in the world, and we wanted to make a helpful list of resources that are actually used on a regular basis.

As we’ve put RAUNCON together, this has been one of my favorite parts of the registration form. If you’re a librarian, you might find some great new resources here. If you’re a publisher or writer, you might be excited/terrified to see where librarians are actually learning about books. And if you’re a blogger, you might like to comb through this list frantically in the hopes that you are on here. I do wish we asked how much time a day people spend with these resources, because balancing “learning about books” with “actually reading books” seems to be an unheralded RA skill at this point. Well, maybe next year.

Filed under books librarians tumblarians libraries readers' advisory

68 notes &

I’m not sure I can write about An Untamed State by Roxane Gay without crying; that’s how it’s wormed under my skin. I might still be too close to it to reflect properly, but I also feel compelled to share it as fast as I can.
I expected that it would be well-written and thoughtful, because I’ve read and been moved by many of Gay’s essays, and it was, of course. I expected it would examine, with grace and ferocity, the intersections of race and class and sex and violence, and it did, in a way that unnerved me and made me think about my place at those intersections. The book transitions quietly between past and present, and from viewpoint to viewpoint, much in the same way that we do in our own heads. Mireille’s mental unraveling and fortitude are constant companions throughout the book and then after it ends. I had high hopes for this book, and it did not disappoint me. 
What I didn’t expect, however, was a love story. A fine love story, a love story for the ages. The atrocities on the page are illumined by the complicated and pure love between Mireille and her husband Michael, as well as between Mireille and her mother-in-law. Many of the scenes of intense violence in this book brought tears to my eyes, but it was the scenes of frustrated love and compassion that made me weep in the corner of the train seat. I don’t know how she did it, combined all these things, but she did, and now it won’t leave me alone.
I look forward to more people reading this book, partially so that I can talk about it in more depth, but just sitting quietly with a fellow reader would be satisfying as well.

I’m not sure I can write about An Untamed State by Roxane Gay without crying; that’s how it’s wormed under my skin. I might still be too close to it to reflect properly, but I also feel compelled to share it as fast as I can.

I expected that it would be well-written and thoughtful, because I’ve read and been moved by many of Gay’s essays, and it was, of course. I expected it would examine, with grace and ferocity, the intersections of race and class and sex and violence, and it did, in a way that unnerved me and made me think about my place at those intersections. The book transitions quietly between past and present, and from viewpoint to viewpoint, much in the same way that we do in our own heads. Mireille’s mental unraveling and fortitude are constant companions throughout the book and then after it ends. I had high hopes for this book, and it did not disappoint me. 

What I didn’t expect, however, was a love story. A fine love story, a love story for the ages. The atrocities on the page are illumined by the complicated and pure love between Mireille and her husband Michael, as well as between Mireille and her mother-in-law. Many of the scenes of intense violence in this book brought tears to my eyes, but it was the scenes of frustrated love and compassion that made me weep in the corner of the train seat. I don’t know how she did it, combined all these things, but she did, and now it won’t leave me alone.

I look forward to more people reading this book, partially so that I can talk about it in more depth, but just sitting quietly with a fellow reader would be satisfying as well.

Filed under books an untamed state roxane gay

195 notes &

My Librarian takes a big step toward humanizing the online library experience. It could also give the library a tactical advantage over online booksellers like Amazon.

The Oregonian reports on My Librarian, the coolest development in online readers’ advisory I’ve heard in ages, and at a Cloud Library, Multnomah County Library. 

From the story, which you should read from top to bottom:

My Librarian [is] an online tool that lets readers connect with a real-life librarian, without actually visiting a library branch. Instead, readers can build a relationship with one of 13 librarians through video chats, blogs and phone calls to discuss their favorite books.

(via cloudunbound)

Ugh, I am sick with jealousy over how AMAZING this is.

Filed under libraries tumblarians readadv readers' advisory