Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

5 notes &

Well, I’m not a doctor, so take me with a grain of salt. All I know is that when I started my new job, I went months without exercising at all (embarrassing but true), and my commute was worse on my feet (I walk slightly less than my old commute, and in work-appropriate, unsupportive flats rather than sneakers). And yet, somehow my legs and feet got stronger, which is very good for avoiding PF. (As you know if you’ve had it, the only real cure is rest, so it’s best not to get it in the first place.)
I hadn’t run long-distance for almost a year when I started training again, because the PF had gotten so bad by the time I gave up that it took that long to go away. I had a number of elaborate stretching routines that helped a bit, but mornings were still pretty bad. And when I started my new commute, I was still getting those heel pains, but I was too vain to be the lady in work clothing and running sneakers on the train, so I just sucked it up. But about a month after I switched to a standing desk, all those problems disappeared. And then my training went great. This morning I thought for sure I’d feel that stabby-heel-pain, but they’re fine. Thus I credit the standing desk!
Do you think your employer would let you convert part of your existing desk into a standing desk? I’ve seen many articles online about how to do that easily and cheaply. I am lucky that my employer went along with my nutty idea, but if they hadn’t, that was my plan B.

Well, I’m not a doctor, so take me with a grain of salt. All I know is that when I started my new job, I went months without exercising at all (embarrassing but true), and my commute was worse on my feet (I walk slightly less than my old commute, and in work-appropriate, unsupportive flats rather than sneakers). And yet, somehow my legs and feet got stronger, which is very good for avoiding PF. (As you know if you’ve had it, the only real cure is rest, so it’s best not to get it in the first place.)

I hadn’t run long-distance for almost a year when I started training again, because the PF had gotten so bad by the time I gave up that it took that long to go away. I had a number of elaborate stretching routines that helped a bit, but mornings were still pretty bad. And when I started my new commute, I was still getting those heel pains, but I was too vain to be the lady in work clothing and running sneakers on the train, so I just sucked it up. But about a month after I switched to a standing desk, all those problems disappeared. And then my training went great. This morning I thought for sure I’d feel that stabby-heel-pain, but they’re fine. Thus I credit the standing desk!

Do you think your employer would let you convert part of your existing desk into a standing desk? I’ve seen many articles online about how to do that easily and cheaply. I am lucky that my employer went along with my nutty idea, but if they hadn’t, that was my plan B.

Filed under running plantar fasciitis standing desk

  1. liannakristine said: I use this (amazon.com/Stand-D…) & love it — basic & you can still see through it to view your whole monitor
  2. sourdoughislife said: Ah, maybe I can rig something to go on top of my desk. Will investigate. Thanks!
  3. bookavore posted this