Bookavore

voracious reader with a certain verbal attitude

Posts tagged madeline miller

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The Song of Achilles is great though serious fun! You should read it.
I think it’s a fair assumption that if you read my blog you are a nerd, which means when you were a kid, you were just a flat-out dork, which means you had at least one period of obsession with Greek mythology and its unending stories and things to memorize. (I had only had one myself, but I had two periods of Egyptian-mythology obsession, the blame for which rests with Zilpha Keatley Snyder.)
If I have assumed correctly, then you should read this book, which will plunge you right back into the glory of all that insanity, except with more overt acknowledgement that, yeah, some Greeks were gay. (Even the famous ones. Especially the famous ones.) The tone and the pace are perfect. But what I loved most about it was that Miller has done such a good job of bringing to life what’s always fascinated me most about that period in history: the gauze-y vagueness of living in a time where the gods were as much a part of life as weather, and just as incomprehensible. The scariness and banality of a world at constant war, with tangled loyalties and family trees. The humanity people had then, too, and the way they faced death. 
A strange afteraffect of this book is that I finished it last night, and then today started tearing through Bring Up The Bodies (of course, it’s amazing so far, I can’t believe I took a break from it to write this), and Achilles is ALL OVER that shit. Achilles this, Achilles and Hector that. Nary a Tudor can resist the allure of an Achilles reference!
I like when the books talk to each other. It’s trippy.

The Song of Achilles is great though serious fun! You should read it.

I think it’s a fair assumption that if you read my blog you are a nerd, which means when you were a kid, you were just a flat-out dork, which means you had at least one period of obsession with Greek mythology and its unending stories and things to memorize. (I had only had one myself, but I had two periods of Egyptian-mythology obsession, the blame for which rests with Zilpha Keatley Snyder.)

If I have assumed correctly, then you should read this book, which will plunge you right back into the glory of all that insanity, except with more overt acknowledgement that, yeah, some Greeks were gay. (Even the famous ones. Especially the famous ones.) The tone and the pace are perfect. But what I loved most about it was that Miller has done such a good job of bringing to life what’s always fascinated me most about that period in history: the gauze-y vagueness of living in a time where the gods were as much a part of life as weather, and just as incomprehensible. The scariness and banality of a world at constant war, with tangled loyalties and family trees. The humanity people had then, too, and the way they faced death. 

A strange afteraffect of this book is that I finished it last night, and then today started tearing through Bring Up The Bodies (of course, it’s amazing so far, I can’t believe I took a break from it to write this), and Achilles is ALL OVER that shit. Achilles this, Achilles and Hector that. Nary a Tudor can resist the allure of an Achilles reference!

I like when the books talk to each other. It’s trippy.

Filed under books song of achilles bring up the bodies madeline miller hilary mantel